PORK RIB ROAST WITH APPLES AND CALVADOS CREAM

PORK RIB ROAST WITH APPLES AND CALVADOS CREAM (for four)

Pork, rib roasts, pork rib roast with apples and calvados cream 1a OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

pork loin roast, bone-in, of about 8 chops

1 small bunch fresh sage, washed

3 to 4 large garlic cloves, peeled

olive oil

salt and pepper

3 to 4 cups apple cider for the roasting pan

4 tablespoons unsalted butter

10 Granny Smith or golden delicious apples, peeled, cored and cut into eighths

6 tablespoons firmly packed light brown sugar

¼ cup calvados

¾ cup dry white wine

1-½ cups heavy cream

¾ teaspoon celery salt

½ teaspoon crumbled dried sage

 


 

1. Preheat oven to 450*. Rinse the pork loin under cold water and pat it dry with paper towels.

2. Finely chop the sage and garlic together and stuff it into the slits between the chops on the underside of the pork loin. Score the fat on top of the loin in a diamond pattern and rub the loin on all sides with olive oil, salt and pepper.

3. Add about 2 cups of apple cider to the roasting pan, place the loin on a rack in the pan, and roast in the middle of the oven at 450* for 1-½ hours. Check periodically and add more cider if needed to prevent burning the bottom of the pan. When done, remove the roast to a platter and rinse the baking pan.

4. Return the roasting pan to the top of the stove and add the butter. Saute the apples with 3 tablespoons of the brown sugar over moderately high heat, turning them, for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the calvados, wine, remaining 3 tablespoons brown sugar, cream, celery salt and the dried sage, bring the mixture to a boil, and add the pork loin with any juices that have accumulated on the platter.

5. Cover the pan with aluminum foil and return to the oven for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the apples are tender. Transfer the roast to the platter and, using a slotted spoon, surround it with the apples. Simmer the sauce left in the roasting pan for 1 minute and pour it over the roast and apples.

 

adapted from Gourmet Magazine, October, 1990

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